Red meat and diabetes, the CSIRO diet link

It’s always interesting when a person changes their mind. Peter Clifton is a co-author of the biggest selling diet book in Australian history … The CSIRO Total Wellbeing diet. A diet built on research involving 200 grams of red meat per day. The book sold over a million copies and, wait for it, we still have an obesity epidemic.  In the research on which the best selling diet was based, the people on the high meat diet lost exactly the same amount of weight as the people on the control diet; which shouldn’t be surprising because both diets contained the same number of kilojoules.

But the CSIRO simply told the public the opposite, namely that people on the diet lost more weight …when they didn’t.  So it’s not surprising that a million copies of the diet hasn’t solved our obesity problems. The diet didn’t work and the CSIRO knew as much. What’s Clifton doing these days? He began a 2011 study with the words:

Meat protein is associated with an increase in
risk of heart disease. Recent data have shown that meat
protein appeared to be associated with weight gain over
6.5 years, with 1 kg of weight increase per 125 g of meat
per day.

And now in 2016 he’s looking further at the link between red and processed meat and diabetes. Eat a meal of red meat and bread … rather like a hamburger … and your insulin levels spike. Do this often enough and you may develop insulin resistance and diabetes.

Will we ever see a CSIRO vegan diet? Don’t hold your breath.

 

Comments are closed